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Sun, 17th November 2019
 

Questions & Answers

 
BREASTS

Q: 

Is it OK to take hormonal replacement therapy following surgery for breast cancer?

A: 

Current advice is not to take female hormones following breast cancer. The hormones may stimulate breast tissue, and be counter-productive according to Professor Barry Wren and others at the Menopause Clinic. Sensible nutrition, adequate exercise, and a positive happy outlook at least will help the way you feel.

 
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HEARING

Q: 

I seem to be hard of hearing, but only on one side. Could this be due to wax in the canal?

A: 

Could be, but a check with the doctor will soon give the answer. If the canals are clear, referral to an ear specialist is essential. One sided deafness may be due to an acoustic neuroma, or growth on the hearing nerve. This is very serious and needs prompt investigation and treatment. If left, it may be fatal.

 
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MARGARINE

Q: 

A new margarine is claimed to lower cholesterol levels. Is this worthwhile?

A: 

According to medical reports, the answer is yes. However, chopping down on animal fats, in whatever form also helps. Psyllium (2-3 tsp a day in water) is also a simple natural way to reduce elevated levels. Regular exercise also helps. If it remains high, suitable medication is readily available from your GP.

 
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LIPS

Q: 

I suffer from uncomfortable cracks at the corners of my lips.

A: 

This is common, aggravated by cold weather. Infections quickly jump in making it worse. Fungal, yeast, and bacterial infections are common. Cleanse with liquid paraffin on a piece of cotton wool and wipe off. Then apply canesten cream, or tea tree oil. If this fails, Kenacomb cream is often excellent. Simple application of dark honey (ideally Manuka honey) fixes others. If persisting, a check for anaemia or some other hidden nasty is suggested.

 
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IRON MAN

Q: 

I felt crook in the gut, and the doctor ordered a blood test which says I have too much iron. Is this serious?

A: 

Haemochromotosis, an excess of iron, is an inherited disorder and must be promptly treated. This consists of venesection, regular removal of blood. This is best carried out under the supervision of a physician or haematologist (blood specialist), often at a major public hospital. Left, the excess iron will gradually destroy the heart, kidneys, liver and other vital organs.

 
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SICK KIDS

Q: 

Why do kids become sick so often these days?

A: 

I believe most is self-inflicted, and often parents maybe to blame. Low nutritious meals, junk food, take-away fast food, fat soaked chips and heaps of coloured fizz drinks are starters. Lack of exercise, stuck in front of telly and computers instead of playing outside, kicking a football, playing cricket, chasing, hopscotch or anything else is worthwhile. Cycling, swimming, gardening (yes, even for kids) helping with household chores are all simple ways to better health. It must start in early childhood.

 
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LAUGHTER

Q: 

Why do we feel so much better after a good laugh with our friends?

A: 

Because the body produces chemicals called endorphins, the systems feel good enzyme. This surges around the system making you tingle and sparkle, with an inner feeling of euphoria and good will to all. Exercise of any type produces similar effects. It is not hard to smile, rather than be grouchy to others. You are the one to benefit most, but the recipient also feels great. Try it and see.

 
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MEDICATION

Q: 

When a prospective mother years ago, I was given a drug to help prevent a miscarriage. I have been told this could adversely affect my daughter, now 35 years old. My doctor has not heard of this?

A: 

A certain hormone was popular at the time to prevent miscarriage. However, in a very small number of female babies this increased risk of cervical cancer developing as they become older. This means a regular pelvic check and smear test are even more important in these daughters. I have never seen a case, but they are still reported in the medical journals from time to time.

 
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PINS & NEEDLES

Q: 

I notice pins and needles in my hands and fingers. Is this serious?

A: 

It sounds like carpal tunnel syndrome. This means pressure on the nerves travelling to the hands and fingers at the wrist. Nerve conduction tests will indicate if this is so. Then referral to a doctor specialising in carpal tunnel surgery is recommended. This will relieve the nerve pressure, and the pain and tingling usually vanish.

 
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This health advice is general in nature. You are advised to seek medical attention from your doctor or health care provider for your own specific symptoms and circumstances.

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