Doc Wright, Australia's #1 Media Medic. Medical advice for all the family.

Hear Dr Wright daily on Sydney's No 1 Radio Station

2UE

Download a list of other radio stations around Australia here.

newer   older
 
  article topic 

Article
Wed, 15th February 2017
 

Lots of people suffer from sweaty hands, which can interfere with normal work activities. Sweating is a normal body activity aimed at keeping body temperature normal. Perspiration dries, sucking heat from the system, so is greater in hot weather. There are millions of sweat glands in the scalp, armpits, hands and feet, the usual problem areas.

Botox is available, which when injected near the nerve to the arm, can quickly bring it under control. It must be repeated, if symptoms recur, every 3-6 months and is expensive. Sometimes a huge gland may be felt in the armpit (axilla). A plastic surgeon may remove this with a triangular incision and this too is usually effective long term.

Another alternative, now seldom used, is "cervical sympathectomy". The sympathetic nerve to the arm is cut. That means no perspiration at all on that arm. There is a perpetually dry arm and hand. Many say this is worse than the moist sweaty one. It is also irreversible, so think well before undergoing the knife.

The condition has the fancy medical name of hyperhidrosis. Doctors revel in words nobody but themselves understand. If sweat means you are continually washing your hands, use a non alkaline soap, for overwashing in itself can cause the reverse - dry skin. Alkaline forms the basis of most soaps and ravages skin surfaces over time, just as it stings the eyes when showering. Try Dove, pH5.5, Ego QV skin bar and similar lines.

 
MEASLES

Q: 

I recently heard of a child who had measles in infancy, got over it OK, but suddenly woke up one morning when 12 and was completely "ga ga".

A: 

This is a sad but true story. The measles virus is very naughty. Although most kids overcome it OK, in some it lurks in the brain and nerves. Suddenly and without warning, the dreadful effects of brain damage emerge. There is no treatment, apart from supportive back up. This increases yet again the need for all infants to receive the measles vaccination, with appropriate updates. Parents who resist vaccination programmes are simply exposing their growing children to terrifying outcomes, rare though they be.

 
^back to top
 
MEDICATION COUGH

Q: 

I have been taking certain heart medication, and have developed a constant irritating cough, which cough remedies do not help. Some of my friends on similar medication say the same.

A: 

The powerful heart medication called the ACE inhibitors are very valuable for cardiac cases. A common side effect is this little recurring cough. Talk to your doctor, who may suggest another brand. However, many respond positively to the oral anti-asthma spray nedocrimal (Tilade). It is harmless. A couple of puffs 1-3 times a day (or even more) often resolves the issue. It is safe and on the PBS.

 
^back to top
 
ERECTIONS

Q: 

I am a mid teen guy, and get one helluva erection when I see a gorgeous chick passing by. (Or even a non gorgeous one, providing she has a good looking bust). Am I abnormal?

A: 

This simply means you are a normal true blue Aussie male. Hormones have already started kicking in, and will only get better (or worse, depending on your personal view) as age advances. Nature only cares about reproducing the species. That's why you get so horny. Tight jocks is about as good as you can get as a control. Never dash lustful thoughts. One day (sad to say), it will all end. You may need a prostate removal (but not until you're in your 70s or 80s) when it will all vanish. Lucky You.

 
^back to top
 
THE COMPUTER

Q: 

I am in my sixties, and often my computer "goes down", or wont work. I have found the quickest remedy is to call the 7 year old kid from next door. In 30 seconds it is up and working again. Is my brain dissolving?

A: 

Many parents and nearly all grandparents encounter identical issues and certainly use the same system, which is quick, easily accessible, and costs nothing! Their brains have lived with computers since Day One, whilst such abilities never developed in adult minds. Instead, theirs became competent at skills which were required during their lifetime. Do not be despaired. For in the fullness of time, computers and all that technology will also be relegated to "Use By" date, as something new takes over. Maybe a pen, knib and bottle of ink. Amazing. History does repeat itself.

 
^back to top
 
TIA & TIE

Q: 

My mum experienced a momentary funny weakness in her face, and it has recurred a couple of times, but then vanishes.

A: 

See the doctor. This is most likely, a TIA or now more probably called a TIE. That's "Transient Ischaemic Attack" (now "Event", the new word, but same thing.) It is really a "mini" stroke. A tiny cerebral blood vessel has probably gone into spasm, or clogged up, momentarily neutralizing nerve impulses to certain muscles. It can be anywhere, but often noticed if on the face. Intervention is needed. She may require a blood thinner, such as simple aspirin (100 mg a day like Cartia), or other product called Iscover. Follow up is essential to avoid a major catastrophe.

 
^back to top
 

This health advice is general in nature. You are advised to seek medical attention from your doctor or health care provider for your own specific symptoms and circumstances.

NEWSLETTER

MY SYMPTOM OR ILLNESS IS

Just Ask Dr James Wright.

Coughs, colds, aches and pains, feeling off colour, painful joints, sweaty and miserable? Whatever your symptom, or illness, Dr James Wright may help you, and answer your questions.

Simply log onto docwright.com.au type in your symptom in the space on the left hand column, click topic and up it comes. Simple easy-to-follow information Dr Wright has written over the past several years. Then click contact us if you have a special message.

MONTHLY HEALTH BULLETIN

You can subscribe (no cost) to Dr James Wright's Monthly Health Bulletin by emailing your name and email address to newsletter@docwright.com.au. The bulletin contains up-to-date health tips and news for wellbeing. A copy of the current Bulletin may be viewed online here.

Dr James Wright is associated with lovely Vimiera Retirement Village (vimieravillage.com.au) in the leafy Sydney (NSW) suburb of Eastwood. It is operated by Mediaid Centre Foundation (mediaid.org.au), a non-profit Public Benevolent Institution which provides housing for the elderly, as well as providing a large amount of health information.

Waiting to hear from you Dr James Wright.